What does sex have to do with.. college student’s view on assault

For a final project, I was apart of a group of four girls, who happen to be curious Vanderbilt students. Not girls, women. Our blog is constructed by a strong group of women who want change. What is the change we want? Well, as of right now, we aren’t entirely sure. Thats why we are asking YOUR opinion. We want to look at the way that students on campus look at sexual assault. Currently on most college campus’, students are given and/or are practically forced into taking surveys given by administration required by law. Does this help? Yes and no: rape is still an ongoing issue. We want to find out how students define the term rape and interview select individuals. We want to circulate a blog full of facts, opinions and ideas regarding sexual assault and prevention of sexual assault. This blog most likely will not stop it, but small steps in the right direction is all that we are looking for.

We want the student’s voices to be heard in a concept that is open to opinions and not required by the law. We want to make college students’ stronger. We want to see the difference ourselves by creating change.

As a group, we interviewed and hopefully continue to interview, ask to define, and capture via photograph anonymous responses of college students:  students who have, and have not been through the experience of sexual assault. We post initial responses to the questions (aka mood/reaction to the proposed questions), responses, as well as a pictures taken of their feet the day the questions were asked in terms of anonymity.

During our final project, we found some interesting concepts. Older students typically gave very definite, almost deep answers in response to what their definition of sexual assault is. Younger students usually gave a more broad answer. Female students answering the questions typically felt uncomfortable answering the questions, meanwhile men seemed to be more comfortable. In the interviewing process, we also asked a few students outside of the Vanderbilt community. I was able to reach out to a few moms of college students, as well as students and student athletes at other colleges.

Answers typically said that students would in fact report the rape to the police if they had knowledge of one. However, this totally contradicts the studies and research done every year. Students usually leave rape cases unreported.

We hope you find interest in the blog and find it informative and inspiring for change not only on college campuses today, but in the generations to come.    www.wgs160group.tumblr.com <<<—- CLICK HERE

Now I ask you to please give your responses to the questions we asked students across the U.S.

-How would you define sexual assault?

-Would you be willing to report a sexual assault if seen/done?

-Do you know who you could report it to/or do you know who could guide you through the process (on campus)?

-Do you think women are seen as the victims and that they are not being taken as seriously as they should be?

-How large of a role do you think alcohol plays in campus rape culture?

-Do you know anyone who has been personally affected by rape culture? (On/off campus)

-Do you think that Vanderbilt’s system of preventing rape is effective?

 

 

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Final Concept Analysis Post

For me, the most important topic that we covered in class this year was sexual objectification. I had no idea that so many different aspects and parts of society played such roles in how boys define girls, and vice versa. Sexual objectification’s meaning is different for everyone, especially men.

In the text, we learned that some men are afraid of looking homosexual, and therefore objectify woman. Certainly, most men would not agree with this statement. However, the way that society has been over the past few decades has certainly shaped this mentality without men realizing its impact. We red many interviews of men and learned that there is wide variety of sexual preferences, especially during intercourse that men prefer. Although not homosexual, men can have some strange preferences based on their desires.

In learning about sexual objectification, we also learned about sexual assault and rape. I think that sexual assault (in particular rape), and sexual objectification have a lot in common. To me, women who are raped are not viewed as wholesome to the offender, as he/she views him or herself.. They degrade the victim, and dehumanize them in the act of seeking sexual or mental pleasure. The pleasure involved in rape cases is something that is an ongoing, very serious problem. Rapists are all trying to fill some sort of void, and fill it by pushing their problems to someone else in one of the worst ways possible.

Learning about people living wholesome lives after experiencing sexual assault was very interesting to me. It brought joy to me knowing that some people experience such sadness, and though the darkness, they can see light at the end of the tunnel. I really enjoyed visiting the museum and photo collection held here at Vanderbilt. All of the pictures were very eye opening. Although no one in the class has undergone exactly what the woman photographed went through, I think that it all brought a deeper understanding to the long-term effects of domestic violence, sexual assault, and sexual objectification.

When we talked more about sexual objectification and rape, more windows opened when we learned about programs on campus, and were required to do an on campus group project. This way, all of the students were able to learn about different ways to stay safe on campus, and learn about the resources that we are offered. I think that this was helpful, but it also made me realize which programs seemed effective meanwhile others seemed to be put in place but didn’t make an impact.

Overall, I feel this class was extremely helpful in making conversations about sex and the many impacts it has on society today. I think that the class made this topic a lot easier to talk about. It made talking about very important and sensitive topics such as sexual assault something that I could talk about comfortably with my friends, in a way that made us all learn. Being able to learn about the sensitive and dark sides of being apart of the LGBTQIA community was incredibly eye opening, and made it easier to look at things with more background and understanding.

Project Safe and the Power of Language

 

The power of language becomes very evident when trying to tackle issues that are very prevalent yet rarely discussed. With sexual assaults increasing at alarming rates throughout the nation, we are at a point wh

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What’s Sex Got to do with … Kim Kardashian

To many people, sex has everything to do with Kim Kardashian. Kim Kardashian rose to fame after her sex tape Continue reading

What’s Sex Got to do With… Kaleena Mosqueda-Lewis

http://espn.go.com/video/clip?id=11950266

Kaleena Mosqueda-Lewis is a guard one UCONN’s women’s basketball team. She has recently talked to ESPN because many people are questioning her weight. It all started with an article/blog on http://www.theday.com/sports-columns/20141124/a-delicate-topic-that-cant-be-ignored

Excerpt from article:

“It is for this reason that I believe Kaleena Mosqueda-Lewis’ weight is an appropriate topic in a public forum. I know. Delicate. She’s a kid, not a professional. But, you know, if Charles Barkley was the “round mound of rebound” when he played at Auburn, why is it out of bounds to discuss the importance of whether Mosqueda-Lewis can get in better shape by March and thus fulfill the responsibility she has to her teammates? It’s an uncomfortable discussion, sure. But fair. Besides, aside from injury, Mosqueda-Lewis’ inability to move faster – and by extension, guard anything beyond a chair – is the single biggest obstacle imperiling the 10th championship for the UConn women.” Then in further down in article the author continues to say: “I understand this will offend some folks. I get this is a beyond-the-basketball issue because women are often perceived through how they look and not what they do. I despise the Neanderthals who watch women’s sports to ogle, not appreciate.”

The thing that blows my mind is that this author is questioning Kaleena’s weight and how she looks but then has the nerve to say he deposes the “Neanderthals that perceive women for their looks and not what they do. He’s technically be a hypocrite.

In the video, which is above on the espn website, she responded really well to the criticism she is getting. She states, “she shouldn’t be getting judged on how she looks but how she is playing. She continues to say she is keeping up with her teammates and that the outcome is the most important, If she is helping her teammates and doing her job then nothing should matter”.

This could connect to the article “Sex sells, but what else does it do?”. The article says, “Some people find women’s participation in pornography, both as part of the audience and as part of the production, to be empowering, and argue that is demonstrates the importance of women controlling their own sexuality and others argue that the higher wages exist only because women still have to exploit themselves to make money” (Pappas, 325). So since Kaleena is such a big name in Women’s Basketball do they want her to loose this weight so they can then sexualize her in photos like they do other women athletes? Clearly women in porn is somewhat different then women in sports but they are both being sexualized or judged for their weight or how they look. When is this going to change?

 

 

What’s Sex Got to do With… Final Reflection Post

In reflecting over the past semester, I think that our discourses surrounding different sexualities and sexual identities have been very important and informative.  Something that I have really taken away from our class discussion is the variety of sexual identities out there that deserve recognition, and the ways in which those identities can be divorced from behaviors, in order for us to take a more critical look at peoples’ embodied experiences with their sexualities and gender performances.

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Dating in college…

As you look around Vanderbilt‘s campus, there is a very strong hook-up culture, and dating is a rare sight to see.  This phenomenon described in “Hooking Up: Sex, Dating, and Relationships on Campus” by Kathleen A. Bogle.  To do her study she chose a random sample of college students and interviewed them in order to get their perspectives of what goes on on the college campus and why they may believe it is happening.

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