Whats sex got to do with… “Sexy Can I”

 

The song “Sexy can I” by Yung Berg, Ft. Ray J, is arguably asking for sexual consent throughout the song. Starting almost every line with “Sexy can I” asking if he can perform sexual pleasures in different kinds of ways. Some may argue that this is a form of sexual consent because of the use of such explicit language talking about how the way she shakes “it” makes him like “oh”.

“Girl how you shake it, got a nigga like (oh)

It’s a Kodak moment, let me go and get my camera”

 

“Sexy, can I, visit you at work?

While you slidin down the pole, no panties, no shirt

Then you climb back up the pole, then you drop and do the splits”

Debra Tolman, writer of “Adolescent Girls Sexuality” would use the terms “sexual subjectivity” and “sexual socialization”.  She would use the term sexual subjectivity for either the male or the female, because the male is expressing himself as in he is entitled to having the sexual feelings he is having and making the active decision on talking to the girl in sexual ways.  While for the female (A dancer), she is putting herself out there shaking her booty and swinging on the pole; she is entitled to her sexual behavior.  For the term sexual socialization, it would be toward the woman; because she is socialized that woman should be the object of a man’s desire.

The women he is talking about in this song are viewed as sexual objects and are being used to sell the song.  Could this be viewed in the Marxist approach?  She is using her body to make money, while Yung Berg and Ray J are using her to sell their song to the public.

Steven Siedman in “The Social Construction of Sexuality” states that sex is viewed as social.  That people are born with sexual nature and are biologically driven to engage in procreative behavior; social factors influence with whom this behavior is engaged with (11).  With this said, some may view this song as no problem, because it is natural for these behaviors to happen.  The girl has the mindset that she is a sexual object for the man and it is her job to please him.  This heterosexual behavior is natural throughout history (10).  How do you think the public may have perceived this song if it was guy to guy or girl to girl?

 

Sex is a huge part of today’s culture now, so it is a primary seller.  You see it everywhere, not just in music but in all of the entertainment business and fashion business, like underwear and lingerie.

What are your impressions on society using sex as a big time seller?  Do you think the song would have sold if it were a female singing to a male?

 

 

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