What’s Sex Got to Do With Usher?

Usher has imparted many #1 hits unto the world. From “U Make Me Wanna” to “Confessions” to “OMG,” Usher has graced us with not only his voice, but also his softer, more emotional side. However, what happens when Usher switches gears and speaks about his relationship… with a stripper!?

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What’s Sex Got to do With… Kaleena Mosqueda-Lewis

http://espn.go.com/video/clip?id=11950266

Kaleena Mosqueda-Lewis is a guard one UCONN’s women’s basketball team. She has recently talked to ESPN because many people are questioning her weight. It all started with an article/blog on http://www.theday.com/sports-columns/20141124/a-delicate-topic-that-cant-be-ignored

Excerpt from article:

“It is for this reason that I believe Kaleena Mosqueda-Lewis’ weight is an appropriate topic in a public forum. I know. Delicate. She’s a kid, not a professional. But, you know, if Charles Barkley was the “round mound of rebound” when he played at Auburn, why is it out of bounds to discuss the importance of whether Mosqueda-Lewis can get in better shape by March and thus fulfill the responsibility she has to her teammates? It’s an uncomfortable discussion, sure. But fair. Besides, aside from injury, Mosqueda-Lewis’ inability to move faster – and by extension, guard anything beyond a chair – is the single biggest obstacle imperiling the 10th championship for the UConn women.” Then in further down in article the author continues to say: “I understand this will offend some folks. I get this is a beyond-the-basketball issue because women are often perceived through how they look and not what they do. I despise the Neanderthals who watch women’s sports to ogle, not appreciate.”

The thing that blows my mind is that this author is questioning Kaleena’s weight and how she looks but then has the nerve to say he deposes the “Neanderthals that perceive women for their looks and not what they do. He’s technically be a hypocrite.

In the video, which is above on the espn website, she responded really well to the criticism she is getting. She states, “she shouldn’t be getting judged on how she looks but how she is playing. She continues to say she is keeping up with her teammates and that the outcome is the most important, If she is helping her teammates and doing her job then nothing should matter”.

This could connect to the article “Sex sells, but what else does it do?”. The article says, “Some people find women’s participation in pornography, both as part of the audience and as part of the production, to be empowering, and argue that is demonstrates the importance of women controlling their own sexuality and others argue that the higher wages exist only because women still have to exploit themselves to make money” (Pappas, 325). So since Kaleena is such a big name in Women’s Basketball do they want her to loose this weight so they can then sexualize her in photos like they do other women athletes? Clearly women in porn is somewhat different then women in sports but they are both being sexualized or judged for their weight or how they look. When is this going to change?

 

 

What’s Sex Got To Do With… Video Games?

For years, video games, particularly fantasy games, have been a “boy’s club” of sorts that operates in an environment where many women feel unwelcome to join. If any women at all exists as characters in these games, they are either presented as a “damsel in distress” that needs rescuing, or as a hyper sexualized commodity, or both. While male characters in these games get to wear full sets of body armor, warm underclothes, and well, clothing that seems relatively plausible in the context of the game, female characters are too often portrayed as having an incredibly small waist, disproportionate breasts, and, as Stephen Colbert puts it “armor that barely covers their nipples.” Needless to say, women who would otherwise play these games are feeling shut out and some are starting to raise their voices against this obvious sexism.

Enter Anita Sarkeesian.

Lauded as a hero to many female gamers who so often feel silenced in the male dominated sphere of internet gaming, Sarkeesian, founder of “Feminist Frequency” has received a never ending stream of rape and death threats since starting her crusade. If you are feeling brave, take a look at some of the posts on reddit.com defending the “rights” of some men to blatantly sexualize women in some gaming universes. Sarkeesian’s actions and the backlash that has been created from it is clearly a manifestation of rape culture. Internet users, who are often protected by anonymity, degrade and threaten assault to women who are pointing out the sheer grossness of their social sphere. There is a currently trending quote that has been circulating online recently that I think can be applied to what is happening in the video game world.

“Woman speaks out against misogynistic abuse and is met with misogynistic abuse from men who believe misogynistic abuse doesn’t exist ant that she should stop making them look bad.”

Whats sex got to do with… “Sexy Can I”

 

The song “Sexy can I” by Yung Berg, Ft. Ray J, is arguably asking for sexual consent throughout the song. Starting almost every line with “Sexy can I” asking if he can perform sexual pleasures in different kinds of ways. Some may argue that this is a form of sexual consent because of the use of such explicit language talking about how the way she shakes “it” makes him like “oh”.

“Girl how you shake it, got a nigga like (oh)

It’s a Kodak moment, let me go and get my camera”

 

“Sexy, can I, visit you at work?

While you slidin down the pole, no panties, no shirt

Then you climb back up the pole, then you drop and do the splits”

Debra Tolman, writer of “Adolescent Girls Sexuality” would use the terms “sexual subjectivity” and “sexual socialization”.  She would use the term sexual subjectivity for either the male or the female, because the male is expressing himself as in he is entitled to having the sexual feelings he is having and making the active decision on talking to the girl in sexual ways.  While for the female (A dancer), she is putting herself out there shaking her booty and swinging on the pole; she is entitled to her sexual behavior.  For the term sexual socialization, it would be toward the woman; because she is socialized that woman should be the object of a man’s desire.

The women he is talking about in this song are viewed as sexual objects and are being used to sell the song.  Could this be viewed in the Marxist approach?  She is using her body to make money, while Yung Berg and Ray J are using her to sell their song to the public.

Steven Siedman in “The Social Construction of Sexuality” states that sex is viewed as social.  That people are born with sexual nature and are biologically driven to engage in procreative behavior; social factors influence with whom this behavior is engaged with (11).  With this said, some may view this song as no problem, because it is natural for these behaviors to happen.  The girl has the mindset that she is a sexual object for the man and it is her job to please him.  This heterosexual behavior is natural throughout history (10).  How do you think the public may have perceived this song if it was guy to guy or girl to girl?

 

Sex is a huge part of today’s culture now, so it is a primary seller.  You see it everywhere, not just in music but in all of the entertainment business and fashion business, like underwear and lingerie.

What are your impressions on society using sex as a big time seller?  Do you think the song would have sold if it were a female singing to a male?

 

 

The Dome of Sex: AKA a College Campus

Most people see college as the easiest time to have sex with friends, classmates, or strangers.  It is probably the only period in life where thousands of young people live in the same community and have (for the most part) a similar goal in mind: sex.  For this reason, I see college campuses as domes of sex, and this sexual vibe will not disappear anytime soon.  In Chapter 5: The Campus as a Sexual Arena of “Hooking Up”, Kathleen A. Bogle analyses the prominence of sex in college and how it elicits misperceptions and certain behaviors among students.

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How to Portray Rape on Television

Rape is a crime that has become increasingly prevalent on TV shows. There’s even an entire show dedicated to it’s litigation, Law and Order: SVU. While it is not inherently bad for such crimes to be used in television, it is important that a character’s rape be an important moment in their history. For the victims of sexual violence in SVU, their stories very rarely last more than 45 minutes. One tragic story is substituted for the next creating a seemingly endless conveyor belt of sex crime after sex crime. I would argue that viewers almost become desensitized to the crimes, after potentially watching all sixteen seasons of the show. I believe Law and Order: SVU is a poor representation of portraying rape on screen. There is one show, however, that uses a horrific gang rape to permanently change the characterization of one of its lead characters. That show is Sons of Anarchy. Continue reading